You are browsing the archive for 2012 April.

Holyoke Housing Authority Meeting Rally

2012/04/30 in Action, Activism, Capitalism, Gentrification, HHA, Holyoke, Lyman Terrace, Occupy, Press, Ward 1

Thursday May 3rd 5pm

Facebook Event Page

Two Historic Articles About Lyman Terrace

2012/04/29 in H.U.S.H., History, Holyoke, Lyman Terrace, Poverty, The Republican

For those who haven’t already seen these publications about Lyman Terrace, they are a fascinating look at the concerns of the day and provide important context for understanding the history of this New Deal public housing complex.

From 1942, this piece includes information about the people displaced from the tenements razed to make way for Lyman Terrace; the author was from Mount Holyoke College: http://api.ning.com/files/V89jqQsqrROgt84B3Ph6tWKOR*eIgQ4JFuZmGSLw2EGQZINgSHezItFcSzY7XCl8QE8l4bI7alwr*d4YFvS*vqNXOMeQM8X2/LymanTerraceHewes1942.pdf

And from 1940, this Springfield Republican article includes wonderful descriptions of the design & building materials: http://holyokemass.com/2012/02/22/fine-living-quarters-for-holyoke/

 

Testimony from UMass Architecture Prof. Max Page on Lyman Terrace

2012/04/29 in Activism, Gentrification, History, Holyoke, Lyman Terrace, Ward 1

The following was submitted to last week’s public hearing of the Lyman Street Study Committee, which is examining the possibilities for a historic &/or conservation district for the Lyman Street area (Mater Dolorosa church and Lyman Terrace housing complex are among the structures that could potentially be included):

Testimony to the Lyman Terrace Study Committee

April 26, 2012

Max Page

My name is Max Page.  I am a Professor of Architecture at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.  I write about the history and theory of historic preservation, and am Director of the UMass-Hancock Shaker Village historic preservation program.  We train students to restore historic buildings and to advocate for our common historic resources

When people hear a historic preservationist is speaking, they assume we are only interested in saving pretty old buildings.

I certainly do believe that beautiful architecture and outstanding examples of types of buildings are essential to maintaining our history and creating pleasurable cities and towns.  Without the evidence of the past, and without examples of past achievements in architecture, our cities towns would be lifeless.  Even as we build for today, we must maintain continuity with the past.  Lyman Terrace is indeed important as architecture.  Dating to 1939, and coming out of Roosevelt’s New Deal, the project is an outstanding example of early public housing.   Just because there have been decades of neglect should not prevent you from seeing the strength of the construction and the quality of the idea behind Lyman Terrace.

But, frankly, I probably wouldn’t be getting involved in this struggle if I thought this was only about trying to preserve beautiful architecture.

Historic preservationists are ultimately interested in preservation of communities.  We believe that by honoring the past – by protecting the key buildings and landscapes of our communities, telling their stories, and keeping them in use – we build a more sustainable and just world.

If you preserve Lyman Terrace you will are making a commitment to the idea of affordable public housing in the heart of your city.  You will make a commitment to build a new Holyoke without pushing the poor and people of color to the margins.

If you choose to demolish it you will tearing down a lot more than architecture.

I arrived to live in Atlanta in 1996 just after the city had wiped away Techwood Homes, one of the very first public housing complexes in the country.  They did it for all the reasons some in Holyoke are proposing to tear down Lyman Terrace – they said it was run-down, that there were “better” uses for the space, and so on.  They put up Centennial Plaza, a glitzy, underused park for the Olympic Games.  They never replaced all of those housing units and those they did were built beyond the city center, reinforcing segregation in the city.  What they tore down in Atlanta – and what you are threatening to do here — was a commitment to affordable housing for working people in the heart of that major city.

Don’t do that in Holyoke.  Honor your past.  Don’t wreck it.

Audio from Apr-19-2012 Committee on Redevelopment regarding Lyman Terrace

2012/04/26 in Activism, Bresnahan, Gentrification, H.U.S.H., HHA, History, Holyoke, Lisi, Lyman Terrace, Vega

Public Hearing for Lyman Street Study Committee

2012/04/25 in Activism, Development, H.U.S.H., History, Holyoke, Lyman Terrace

Fight Gentrification

Thursday, April 26th
American Legion Post 351
50 Saint Kolbe Dr.
Holyoke, MA. 01040
534-1861
6:30 p.m.

Informational hearing about the aspects of historic districts
Questions and answers
Map of area
Survey forms
Historic buildings in the area
Written statements accepted

Sponsored by the Fairfield Avenue Local Historic District Committee
Olivia Mausel- 534-4115
Sandy Parent, Wendy Weiss, Matt Chenier,
James Sutter, Peter Papineau, Charles Davignon

To Live in the Hearts of Those That You Leave Behind is Not to Die

2012/04/13 in Activism, Axis Mundi, Carlos Vega, Community, H.U.S.H., History, Holyoke, Masks, Nueva Esperanza

Carlos Vega (Nov 26th 1950-April 12th 2012)

 

After a lengthy battle with cancer Community Organizer and champion for Social Justice Carlos Vega has left us.  A memorial service celebrating Carlos will be held at Holyoke High School on Saturday, April 28 at 4 p.m. Donations in memory of Carlos Vega can be made to the Carlos Vega Fund for Social Justice at the Community Foundation website.

I AM HOLYOKE

2012/04/06 in Art, H.U.S.H., Holyoke, pronography, Rob Deza

PRONOBLEM IS HOLYOKE

Today as part of Rob Deza’s Faces of Holyoke project we (Mojo and I) were photographed by the Pine St fire demolition.

I Am Holyoke

I Am Holyoke

Rob Deza Photography

El Sol Latino, April 2012

2012/04/02 in Development, Gentrification, HHA, History, Holyoke, Lyman Terrace

Available online here: http://issuu.com/elsollatino

 

The main editorial in this edition sets the Lyman Terrace issue in the context of Holyoke’s history with redevelopment issues and how they’ve affected the Latino community here. The guest editorial is copied below with permission:

The great irony of the Holyoke Housing Authority (HHA) plan to demolish Lyman Terrace is that it uses the poor conditions of the development — conditions resulting from decades of neglect by that same Housing Authority — to justify demolition and privatization. In this context, it is not surprising that tenants are discontented with their housing. But is the solution to demolish housing that’s basically sound but needs significant renovation? To thrust tenants onto a shrinking affordable housing market with little hope of finding better housing at affordable prices? Or should tenants and other members of the community have been included in planning long ago, so they could work with the HHA to come up with an effective and sustainable plan to save and improve Lyman Terrace? 

We oppose the HHA’s proposed demolition of Lyman Terrace, a public housing development in Holyoke, for several reasons: residents were not sufficiently consulted, the relocation plan is inadequate, demolition without guarantee of rebuild will significantly reduce the supply of affordable housing in the city and region, demolition and rebuilding carries a higher material, energy and carbon impact than renovation, and lastly, as one of the earliest federally funded housing projects in the country, Lyman Terrace represents New Deal and working class people’s history worthy of preservation while the brick and copper exteriors contribute to downtown Holyoke’s visual sense of place. The architecturally-distinct buildings reflect a period in American history when citizens and their government provided good housing to neighbors who could not afford adequate homes on the private market. This is a noble ideal to emulate today. 

The residents of Lyman Terrace have not had effective representation, which made it impossible for them to be full participants in the process of deciding what happens to their homes. The Tenant Association (TA) at Lyman Terrace was not tenant-run. Not only were HHA property managers and staff present at all TA meetings, but they informed the TA president when and where to have those meetings. In addition, the HHA set a context where genuine input from the residents was near impossible. Both the failed HOPE VI applications and the demolition and disposition plan were presented to the tenants as inevitable. Asking tenants if they want better housing without being reasonably sure that the residents will actually get something better after demolition is unfair and coercive.            

So who are the residents of Lyman Terrace? Many are young working adults for whom housing costs exceed affordability for wages earned. Others are senior citizens or disabled. Many are young children whose schooling would be disrupted by mid-term relocation and whose daily presence playing together in the courtyards under the watchful eyes of numerous adults belies the HHA’s claims that these are “indefensible spaces.” The great majority are Latino, so any relocation plan which drives residents from their community can be seen as racist as well as gentrifying. 

Relocation shouldn’t be considered without certainty of portable Section 8 vouchers and the real ability for tenants to use them. Western Massachusetts lost hundreds of rental housing units to tornados, floods, fires, and bankruptcies while the foreclosure crisis and a weak economy added pressures to the rental market. Yet when asked, the HHA could not quantify how many eligible units will be available for relocatees. Section 8 housing choice is an empty promise if market realities mean families will be forced to leave their community whether they wish to or not. 

Similarly, luring tenants out by suggesting future return is deceptive. Low income housing has been destroyed in far greater numbers than has been rebuilt. Prior inhabitants have not been the beneficiaries of demolition and new construction. And in the case of Lyman Terrace, there is no rebuild plan yet to evaluate. 

The demolition of Lyman Terrace will be detrimental to the residents, and it contradicts an inclusive vision of downtown (re)development for the city of Holyoke. Downtown businesses depend on Lyman Terrace residents, who constitute a source of revitalization. Better property management — including renovations, maintenance and policing — would address problems for the surrounding community, erase stigma, improve quality of life for tenants, and yield economic benefits for area businesses. We all deserve better from the HHA.

There is an assumption that since there are many vacant properties in and around downtown that affordable housing will not be in danger in Holyoke. But how can we be so sure? The HHA is not making any commitment to have those 167 units replaced at the present site. If this site is lost, who is to say we will see those units replaced as affordable housing in a prime location? We would like to see all of Holyoke’s citizens able to live downtown. Demolition and privatization of Lyman Terrace would be a big step in the wrong direction. 

 

Marcella Jayne, Lyman Terrace tenant

Preston Smith, associate professor at Mt. Holyoke College

Susan Van Pelt, Holyoke resident